Consultant Charges Budding Engineers to be Professional in their Undertakings

Consultant Charges Budding Engineers to be Professional in their Undertakings

 
Consultant Charges Budding Engineers to be Professional in their Undertakings

Engr. Thomas Modey (4th from left, front row) with faculty and students of the Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, after the Town and Gown seminar.

Students, who aspire to be Electrical Engineering Consultants should adhere strictly to the rules of the profession and desist from compromising on quality and specification if a stop must be put to the chaos in the area of electricity distribution in Nigeria.

This charge was handed down on Thursday, January 25, 2018, by a Chartered Engineer, Engr. Thomas Modey, who was Guest Speaker at the Town and Gown seminar of the Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Covenant University, where he delivered a lecture on the topic titled, ‘Design Consideration and Material Specification for Electrical Power Distribution Network in Nigeria’.

Engr. Modey, a consultant in the area of power supply, said upcoming engineers have the responsibility of correcting the mistakes made by the older generation of engineers, who allowed the compromisation of electricity plans for specific areas, for instance, overstretching the transformers installed in a low cost housing areas through the use of powerful electrical gadgets and machineries, which were not meant for the areas.

The former Commissioner for Public Utilities in Cross River State urged all engineers to ensure that there is a well-arranged masterplan for every project in the country.

Delving into the topic proper, Engr. Modey said power distribution is a process of getting power to all places so specified and captured, but the concept and implementation of electric power distribution will vary from country to country, and could also vary within the same country.

Electric power, he said, is generated from stations such as gas turbines, thermal power stations, hydro power stations, renewable sources among others, adding that generated power can be taken over very long distances where it is needed in villages, cities, and industries.

“The generated voltage is stepped up in a transformer switch yard, usually located on the premises of a power station. Transmitted voltage then gets to the load centre, which may be factories, cities or towns,” he explained.

Highlighting the tasks to implement in order to get power to consumers, the guest speaker said an electrical engineering consultant require basic information from other professionals. Also, he said, workable engineering designs must be prepared, materials must be selected, and the description of installation and work execution up to handover and commissioning given.

Engr. Modey said the quality of materials used in standard distribution network, like power transformers, aluminium conductors and cables, lightning arrestors, gang isolators among others, must not be compromised. He also sensitised the students to the inherent dangers in working on electricity installations.

In his remarks at the occasion, the Head, Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Dr. Victor Matthews, described Engr. Modey’s presentation as fantastic. He expressed hope that the students had learnt vital lessons from the lecture, which they will find useful in future.

Also at the Town and Gown seminar were the Dean, School of Postgraduate Studies, Professor Samuel Wara, Professors, faculty and staff.